romea - logo
October 18, 2019
Loading
extended search

UK: Trial of neo-Nazi who planned to murder MP and policewoman begins in London

16.6.2018 16:18
The British Labour MP Jo Cox was murdered in 2016 by 52-year-old Thomas Alexander Mair, who singled her out because he viewed her as a
The British Labour MP Jo Cox was murdered in 2016 by 52-year-old Thomas Alexander Mair, who singled her out because he viewed her as a "traitor" to white people.

Jack Renshaw, a 23-year-old British citizen, confessed on 12 June to planning to murder a Labour MP using a machete. Another five men are accused along with him of being members of the banned neo-Nazi organization National Action.

Reuters reported that none of the six suspects indicted has admitted to being members of the organization. Renshaw testified that he bought a machete with the intention of using it to murder MP Rosie Cooper, whom the neo-Nazis believe supports immigration to the UK.

According to the judge, one of the accused, Christopher Lythgoe, agreed with the plan to murder Cooper and is considered the leader of National Action. In 2016, according to the Czech News Agency, that same group gave the go-ahead for the murder of MP Jo Cox.

Renshaw's intention was, according to the prosecutor, not just to assault the politician but to revenge himself against policewoman Victoria Henderson, who interrogated him after his arrest last year. He planned, after committing Cooper's murder, to get attention and to demand to see Henderson.

"He planned to murder the policewoman also. According to his testimony, she was his main target," the judge said.

Lythgoe dissolved National Action after it was banned in December 2016 but sent an e-mail to those involved stating that "In time we will function as we have been until now. We'll just exchange one skin for another."

"The main intention of National Action was to begin a 'race war', to' liberate white Britain from Jewish control', and to prevent communities of ethnic minorities from expanding," said the prosecutor. However, in his view, the defendants in this case are not being convicted for holding those beliefs, but for their "membership in a banned organization that strove to influence society not through democracy and freedom of speech, but by disseminating fear, intimidation, and threats of violence."

ČTK, translated by Gwendolyn Albert
Views: 139x

Don't miss:

Related articles:

Tags:  

Neo-Nazism, UK, ultra-right, Violence



HEADLINE NEWS

More articles from category







..
romea - logo